Ex Porn Addict and Minister: 5 Reasons Pastors Are More Vulnerable to Sexual Temptation

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Pastors are not immune to sexual temptation, in fact, their positions as ministers place them right in the path of danger, says Christian writer Jeff Fisher.

Fisher knows this topic all too well as his former pornography addiction caused him to lose his ministry position at one point. In a blog post written for Church Leaders, Fisher notes five reasons pastors are much more vulnerable than the average Christian to sexual temptation, beginning with the fact that they are in a place of power.

“The pastor is an authority, he is looked up to, he is on stage and he is usually highly regarded. Broken people with damaged lives come regularly to talk with the minister, many of them desperate for a word or attention,” Fisher says.

He also notes that most pastors are often isolated and unaccountable for their actions as many of them tend to spend time alone outside of their ministry setting.

Fisher says this is especially true for small church ministers who are often the only staff member as they tend not to have church leaders asking them about their whereabouts.

Furthermore, he notes that many pastors tend to rarely have protection or policies in place to safeguard them from temptation.

“Few or no precautions are taken when the minister is counseling someone of the opposite sex. And ministers often go on visitation to homes by themselves,” Fisher notes.

He adds, “Policies don’t cure bad behavior or a wayward congregant, but they provide an extra boundary that may be a difference maker in a tempting situation.”

Since most pastors do not have accountability support, Fisher says it is difficult for them to be transparent and they tend to not share their sexual struggles with others or even with fellow ministers for fear of losing their position.

They are also more prone to sexual temptation because pastors are “approval addicts,” says Fisher, as they revolve around the attention and comments of others.

“A minister’s wellbeing, if it is unhealthy, rises and falls with every ‘good sermon’ or ‘sister Jones is mad at you.’ Not only are broken church members looking for attention, but so are broken ministers,” Fisher said.

He adds, “Sexual tension in a minister and parishioner relationship is powerful and deadly. It pushes the button of an approval addict and the needy church member, and can quickly lead to disaster.”

That is why Fisher encourages ministers to begin the conversation about being held accountable because in most cases, “It’s doubtful a lay leader or denominational leader will get the ball rolling until there is a moral failure.”